Battling Anxiety

 

Cast all your cares on him because he cares for you.

—1 Peter 5:7

         Have you ever received a text from your teenager/young adult saying, “Anxiety really bad this morning. Going to class late”? How do we process these words when our child is away from home? The feelings associated with not being able to help are far from fun. I have wanted to pack my bag, jump in the car or plane, and go make everything better. How about you? It’s hard, isn’t it? I’ve learned to slow down in the moment, get quiet, remember the promises God has given me about my child, and ask for prayer support.

         When my child sent that uneasy feeling kind of text, I encouraged them to do their best to get quiet, turn on some worship music, pray, and allow God to meet them where they were at today.

         By grace, I’ve been able to choose trust in God’s ability to meet my child’s need in every way. I intentionally thank him throughout the day for making himself known to my children. 

          I must give my children the freedom to choose Jesus and press into him. I can provide encouragement and tools, but I cannot save them or become their savior

          I read an article recently on how anxiety, fear, and stress impact the brain. The amygdala is an almond-shaped section of the brain that is responsible for a chemical response when negative feelings occur. A simple way to combat these uncomfortable feelings is to breathe deep, practice meditation, and gratitude. Meditation will help calm and shrink the amygdala. Deep breathing will help get more oxygen to the brain and gratitude will shift thoughts away from the amygdala and move us toward the prefrontal cortex. The PFC is where we can think clearly, be creative and make good judgments about our circumstances.  The amygdala lives in the back of the brain and is activated during fight, flight, freeze, or appease moments. Slowing down and taking time to develop a consistent habit of deep breathing and meditation will improve mental health. The benefits of adopting these practices will heighten your emotional intelligence and lessen your emotional response. In other words, it instills a steadiness or calm into your reply or being. Secondly, you gain more mental clarity. Third, you become more self-aware and your empathy increases. Lastly, your attention span grows giving you the ability to stay attuned and present.

          There are many examples of meditation in the Bible. Genesis 24:63 says, “And Isaac went out to meditate in the field toward evening.” The main reason God directs us toward meditating is to achieve perfect peace. “You will keep in perfect peace those whose minds are steadfast, because they trust in you” (Isaiah 26:3).

          How do we become steadfast in our minds? We focus. We get quiet. We meditate. God knows these thoughts will keep our minds in a good and life-giving place. We are to think on what is pure, lovely, and of good report.

          Scripture points us toward obtaining peace in this world. Peace from anxiety and stress. God came to give us his peace. It is his gift to us. Don’t yield to fear or be troubled in your hearts; instead, be courageous!”

  

Patti Reed is wife to Frank and mom to Ryan and Hope. She homeschooled her children for 7 years with a commitment to impact the spiritual, emotional and intellectual health and growth of her children. She is an Entrepreneur and owned a Christian advertising business for 18 years here in DFW. Her most recent venture as a new author and certified coach in conversational intelligence®? began over three years ago when she answered God’s call to write a devotional for parents of teens/young adults coming this Spring.

 

Wash Day Grief

Have you ever noticed the settings on your washing machine as they relate to grief?  Consider these common washing machine settings:

NORMAL:  Normal responses following a loss may include mood changes, changes in eating and sleeping patterns, feelings of anger, abandonment, despair, loss of concentration, loss of energy, and the loss of motivation.  These responses can vary based upon previous loss experiences, our relationships, and even our personality.

SMALL LOAD:  Each person’s grief is a major life event.  However, there may be some days the grief pain is not as intense.  These days offer the time to catch your breath.   Regardless of the relationship…regardless of the circumstances surrounding the loss…it is a major loss.

LARGE LOAD:  Grief can bring on very intense feelings.  These feelings can be overwhelming, even to someone with a history of always being under control.  We can be paralyzed emotionally because of the shock a loss brings.

SPIN CYCLE: Several events can throw a griever into a “spin cycle”.  Holidays, birthdays, anniversaries, photos, music, food, and even fragrances can begin the “spin cycle” of emotions.  These are normal twists and turns along the journey of grief.

RINSE CYCLE:  The rinse cycle is a time of refreshing.  Tears provide a natural rinsing, a cleansing of the soul.  Grief encompasses all of the confusing and painful emotions felt after a loss.  Mourning is the outward expression of these feelings...whether through tears, words, or actions. 

COOL DOWN:  No one can take grief away.  Expressing grief to a safe person, or becoming part of a grief support group, can provide a “cool down” time. These steps can help soften the pain of grief, but the awareness of the loss will remain.  

Give yourself permission to be a “NORMAL” griever.  Some days will bring a “SMALL LOAD” of grief…other days will consist of a “LARGE LOAD”.  The “SPIN CYCLE” may be intense at times…while the “RINSE CYCLE” of tears can cleanse the soul as we mourn the loss.  Peace and acceptance can offer a “COOL DOWN” phase…a time of rest.

Jesus did NOT say “Blessed are those who GRIEVE”!  But, He DID say “Blessed are those who MOURN, for they shall be comforted.” Matthew 5:4.  Grief is the confusing tangle of emotions and feelings that are within following a loss. These may feel like loneliness, sadness, emptiness, anger, guilt and regrets.  No one can see our grief, it is personal and private. 

But, when we talk about these feelings the grief becomes mourning.  A good definition of mourning is “grief gone public”. Mourning may be talking about the feelings, or even actions to honor the life of a loved one who died. Every one grieves, but not everyone mourns in a healthy manner.

Find a safe person who will let you talk about your feelings. As you talk about your grief you are mourning the loss…according to Jesus, that is when you find comfort.

Psalms 147:3 “He heals the brokenhearted, He binds up their heart”.

Bob Willis has served as a Southern Baptist minister and hospice Bereavement Coordinator. He is a frequent speaker on grief, loss, and caregiver issues.  His book “A Guide For Grievers” was released in June 2017, providing information on grief and supporting those who have experienced a loss. Bob has been a sculptor for over 25 years.  In May of 2018, he became the Sculptor at The Great Passion Play, Eureka Springs, Arkansas.

 

Tonight

Tonight

Set your house in order because Christ could come today . . .

And some tasks may be unfinished if you are called away.

An angel may have told you at the early morning light . . .

“Your Lord will come this evening and you’ll be home with Him tonight.”

Our hearts may become clouded as we think of work undone . . .

Those seeds that weren’t scattered and the crowns that we might have won.

There were souls we meant to speak to and Bible verses we meant to share . . .

And there were a lot of wasted moments we could have spent in prayer.

Now there are a few short moments to set undone things right . . .

And feverishly we’d labor until we see the warning light.

We all have a slothful soul and a careless heart and some spiritual eyes that seem to have no sight . . .

We need to work, and not reap in vain regrets, because my Lord Jesus may come tonight.

“Therefore you also must be ready, for the Son of Man is coming at an hour you do not expect.” (Matthew 24:44)

Tom Kesting was born and raised in Bluefield, West Virginia, and attended West Virginia University on a football scholarship. He worked in the marketplace doing sales and marketing for 30 years and worked at In Touch Ministries for 26 years. Tom became a Christian when he was 41 years old. Three days a week he broadcasts a 15-minute inspiration program on Facebook and sends out daily encouraging emails to friends and to those interested in positive encouragement and inspiration. Tom lives in Lilburn, Georgia, and has been married for 20 years.

Saturday, August 1, 2020 1:56 AM

Grief Brings a Suitcase

Saturday, August 1, 2020 1:56 AM
Saturday, August 1, 2020 1:56 AM

I miss my Dad.  One of my favorite pictures of him sits on a bookshelf in an upstairs bedroom—the one displayed at his memorial last year.  He’s wearing a red shirt and blue jeans and is sitting outside the group cabin where we hold our annual family reunions.  Underneath his white straw cowboy hat, his blue eyes seem to look right at me and say, “I miss you too honey, but I’m in a really good place now.”  Blue eyes is one of our shared traits.  I never thought I was the kind of person to talk to a photograph, but when I walk into that room it’s the most natural thing in the world to say, “Hi, Dad.”  Something about looking into those eyes is comforting.  But then, everyone grieves in their own way. 

Grief makes its appearance uninvited, unwelcome, not respecting holidays or the ordinary rhythm of life.  There is no way to predict how it will make you will feel or when it will end.  When Dad died, grief barged in—its weight threatening to bury my ‘normal.’  It took over, parked a suitcase, propped its feet up on the coffee table, and threatened to set up camp, demanding my full attention.

The tears came first.  A flood of full-blown sobbing, overflowing my eyelid banks.  Then they slowed to a river, flowing down my cheeks at will.  Sometimes they fell like a light rain.  Other times they were like a mist on a dreary day, dampening my spirits and making everything blah.   Later they slowed to an internal trickle, an invisible reminder of grief’s stubborn presence.

Desire to connect with those I loved most, especially my siblings, was right on the heels of the tears.  We gathered to reminisce, to cry, to poke around in every memory, and get every drop of comfort and strength from being together.   The umbrella of grief shifted just enough for the light of happy memories to filter through.  I began to gather pictures, searching not just for the best ones of Dad but for candid photos that showed our love for each other and how much we enjoyed family gatherings where the presence of unconditional love allowed for the acceptance of flaws, failures, and foolish mistakes. 

Recently my loved ones and I gathered at Dad’s parents’ gravesite to place his ashes and say our final goodbyes.  I didn’t know whether to expect a suitcase or a pocketful of grief.  It was the suitcase again, but smaller.  It parked by the door of my heart but I didn’t let it stay.  As it says in Ecclesiastes 3:1 – 4, there is a time for everything:  birth and death, weeping and laughing.  In His timing, God reaches down, tenderly gathers the pieces to put the heart back together, and sends grief packing.  In its place, He leaves a small overnight bag, replenished constantly with comfort and peace each time we open it to share our heart with Him.

BIO: Kim Robinson 

is a native Texan.  She and her husband have six children and fourteen grandchildren and enjoy spending time with family.  Passionate about parenting, she writes and speaks about a variety of issues facing parents with teenagers in crisis.   She has been a speaker at women’s retreats, local worship events, and various women’s organizations. 

Kim is active in various ministries at her church, a supporter of the Kairos prison ministry, and a past parent representative on the National Council of Juvenile Justice and Family Court Judges.  She enjoys blogging, reading, gospel and blues music, singing, and keeping her grandchildren.  Check out her blog at www.kimrobinson.co

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